Zacharias, Mohler, and Sproul on the Emergent Church

Interesting video…

I thought Ravi’s comments are “worth the millenium.” The following starts at around 4:55,

Sproul:When Christians make confessions of faith propositionally and say “here we stand this is what we believe”, the emergent church was a built-in allergy to that don’t you think Al [Mohler]?

Zacharias: Vance Havner who had a very sharp wit with his one liners…

Mohler: He wasn’t emerging from anything?

Zacharias: Nope. He made the comment years and years ago when he was around. He said “when the tide is low every shrimp has his own puddle.” This [Emergent Church?] is another one of these puddles.

And it makes me wonder. There is seriously… with these men and women who are the progenitors of it, were they bored with God? What brought this about? You know, what brought this methodology into a theology? When you write a book like “The Secret Message of Jesus”? [by Brian McLaren] What?!?! 2,000 years have gone by now suddenly he’s found the secret to it, we didn’t know it?

This is so bizarre, but you know the problem is that we got non-critical people listening to this stuff and they absorb it.

When you read Brian McLaren every chapter dies the death of a 1,000 qualifications… At the end of it you wonder what he really believes and maybe something on Monday something else on Tuesday. He’s an anti-doctrinaire doctrinaire doctrinizing individual always postulating doctrine while he’s anti-doctrine.

These are hard words but it is pitiful to watch something like this actually gain currency

(H/t: Reclaiming the Mind)

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Tsukiji Fish Market

I’ve enjoyed reading National Geographic since I was a lad (yes for the articles). The pictures are top notch as well and they complement the stories quite nicely.

One thing I enjoy about the magazine is their propensity to do stories on far away and exotic places (i.e. the Kuril Islands).

At work, we have an old National Geographic from 1995. The cover story is about man’s harvesting of the sea and its effects.

However, within that story there is an article about the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo which I have read more than a few times. I was amazed at some of the facts about the market presented in the piece.

For example,

  • It handles more than 400 types of seafood
  • It moves about 5 million pounds of seafood every day (approx. $28 million)
  • It employs 60,000 people

Click here for pictures from the National Geographic story.