Politics

Given the current (not to mention hopelessly stagnant) political climate in this nation, it seemed good to share the views (on politics) of two of my favorite columnists.

First up is noted sports columnist Jason Whitlock, who in this column, penned the following (emphasis mine),

Let me make one thing clear: I am neither Republican nor Democrat, liberal nor conservative. I abhor politics because of its inherent untruthfulness. I have never participated in the political process. Never. I don’t share that with a great deal of pride. I’ve just found it impossible to participate in a process that is directly opposed to truth.

Then there is this random thought from distinguished economist and author Thomas Sowell (emphasis mine),

Human beings are going to make mistakes, whether in the market or in the government. The difference is that survival in the market requires recognizing mistakes and changing course before you go bankrupt. But survival in politics requires denying mistakes and sticking with the policies you advocated, while blaming others for the bad results.

What do you think about their words?

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Wall Street Welfare?

Jason Whitlock (left) is a sports writer I enjoy reading immensely. He often says things that need to be said despite pressure from the community not to say them.

In last week’s column, before he listed his sports thoughts he dropped this line:

If welfare destroyed black America, how can welfare save Wall Street and fix America’s economy? I thought we all agreed that welfare was terrible.

Just yesterday, the House of Representatives voted the proposed bailout down.

What I know about high finance amounts to a hill of beans (if that) so I must ask, is this an oversimplification on Whitlock’s part? Or is this an accurate take?

Politics according to Jason Whitlock

This quote comes from Mr. Whitlock’s latest column,

Let me make one thing clear: I am neither Republican nor Democrat, liberal nor conservative. I abhor politics because of its inherent untruthfulness. I have never participated in the political process. Never. I don’t share that with a great deal of pride. I’ve just found it impossible to participate in a process that is directly opposed to truth.

Do you agree with Whitlock? Is that last sentence accurate in its description of politics?

The Whitening of NFL Rosters

I became a huge Jason Whitlock fan after watching him take Al Sharpton to task for the latter’s alarmist tactics.

Whitlock is a gifted writer not to mention a brilliant communicator, which is why he is linked to right in the “Opinion” box.

A column he wrote for Fox Sports (his new home) titled,
“NFL buffoons leaving terrible legacy”, expounds on the effects of hip hop culture on the composition of NFL rosters.

A sample,

African-American football players caught up in the rebellion and buffoonery of hip hop culture have given NFL owners and coaches a justifiable reason to whiten their rosters. That will be the legacy left by Chad, Larry and Tank Johnson, Pacman Jones, Terrell Owens, Michael Vick and all the other football bojanglers.

In terms of opportunity for American-born black athletes, they’re going to leave the game in far worse shape than they found it.

It’s already starting to happen. A little-publicized fact is that the Colts and the Patriots — the league’s model franchises — are two of the whitest teams in the NFL.

If a white journalist would have said this, Al Sharpton would have called for the man’s immediate dismissal and subsequent hanging. Even if our theoretical white journalist would have added what Whitlock did further down the page,

Race is not the determining factor when it comes to having a good or bad attitude. Culture is.

I recommend reading the entire column to consider the following question: Does Jason Whitlock have a point?