Spirituality according to Mohler

Started reading Albert Mohler’s book Culture Shift and it’s typical Mohler: brilliant, concise and thought-provoking.

While there has been plenty of quotable content so far, his description of “spirituality” is noteworthy, not to mention spot-on.

Spirituality as understood by a vast majority of people is as generic as these:

While Mohler’s take on spirituality might be better suited for the Quotable tab above, it was too good a quote to bury it up there.

So without further ado, here are Dr. Mohler’s words on spirituality:

Spirituality is what is left when authentic Christianity is evacuated from the public square. It is the refuge of the faithless seeking the trappings of faith without the demands of revealed truth.

Spirituality affirms us in our self-centeredness and soothingly tells us that all is well. Authentic faith in Christ calls us out of ourselves, points us to the Cross, and summons us to follow Christ.

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New Page: Discussion

Not that I’m trying to go the way of ESPN in regards to their shameless self-promotion, but I have added a new page to this here blog.

Some blogs have a comments policy which outlines what may or may not be said (amazing that those who tout their tolerance can be anything but as they refuse to post comments which they simply don’t agree with), but this is not the route I wanted to take with this page.

So without further ado, here is “Discussion”.

Mohler on Jesusanity

Often the call is heard within Christian circles that we need to be “red-letter Christians”. What is probably meant by this is we need to primarily focus on Jesus’ actual words in the Gospels. That is, the things He taught during his 3-year ministry in Palestine.

Focus on these words more than the words in the rest of the New Testament. Words written through the inspiration of the Holy Spirit (who by the way Jesus sent). What is conveniently forgotten is that the “red-letters” were also written under the inspiration of the same Spirit.

What this call translates to in our modern world after it gets sifted through a couple of political filters is that we need to focus on issues such as helping the poor (with nary a regard for prudence) and/or rescuing the environment from our predations (regardless of other considerations).

Other topics which are deemed more personal like abortion and homosexuality are left by the wayside since allegedly Jesus didn’t address them in those infamous red-letters. Again what is forgotten is that the Spirit whom Jesus sent inspired Paul to reiterate the fact that homosexuality is abomination in God’s sight, so in effect Jesus did address this “issue”.

As for abortion (the murder of one’s own child), it doesn’t take a seminary degree to realize where Jesus stands on murder, much less infanticide.

Dr. Mohler posted on the conflict between this brand of spirituality as it stands in contrast with biblical Christianity.

“Christianity vs. Jesusanity — The Postmodern Temptation”

Prelutsky column reminds of the “Cultural Christianity” of Dr. Dawkins

Last month, Burt Prelutsky wrote a column titled,
“I’m Happy to Live in a Christian Nation”

in which he made it explicitly clear that “religion plays no part” in his life, save for his subscription to those nebulous “Judeo-Christian values”.

That being the case he also asserts,

although I do not accept that we are all fallen creatures or that Jesus Christ died for my sins, I am thankful that I live in a Christian nation.

He then goes on to explain why. His words could stand to be more charitable however.

Mr. Prelutsky’s column reminded me of Professor Richard Dawkins recent (relatively speaking) admission that he considers himself a cultural Christian, click here for that story.

By the way Dr. Albert Mohler commented on Prof. Dawkins’ words here.

Dr. Dawkins’ said this about the U.K.,

“I’m not one of those who wants to stop Christian traditions.

“This is historically a Christian country. I’m a cultural Christian in the same way many of my friends call themselves cultural Jews or cultural Muslims.

“So, yes, I like singing carols along with everybody else. I’m not one of those who wants to purge our society of our Christian history.

“If there’s any threat these sorts of things, I think you will find it comes from rival religions and not from atheists.”

That may be the case in the U.K but it seems that here in the States, this kind of thing is spearheaded by so-called atheists.

Mohler: The Awkward Irony of the Atheist Sunday School

Interesting commentary from Dr. Albert Mohler,
The Awkward Irony of the Atheist Sunday School

Here’s the last paragraph,

In a strange way, the rise of atheist Sunday Schools illustrates the central dilemma of atheism itself. Try as they may, atheists cannot avoid talking about God — even if only to insist that they do not believe in Him. Now, atheist parents are organizing Sunday Schools as a parallel to the Christian practice. In effect, atheists are organizing themselves in a way similar to a local church. At least some of them must sense the awkward irony in that.

Ironic indeed…