Juneteenth tragedy reveals the heart’s bondage to sin

Juneteenth (June 19) is a big deal here in Texas amongst the Black community. Why? Because it celebrates the day in which the words of the Emancipation Proclamation made their way to Texas. That speech given by President Lincoln promised freedom to slaves living in the Confederacy.

Recently in Austin, a man was beaten to death by an angry mob at a Juneteenth festival. Beaten to death because he was protecting the driver of the vehicle he was riding. The driver had apparently struck a child (not seriously injured) and thus the crowd’s anger.

It is ironic that at an event which celebrates the release of blacks from oppression, some of them chose to imitate the actions of their oppressors by resorting to mob violence. The ruthless lynchings carried out by whites against blacks are a blight on this nation’s history, but this incident doesn’t “atone” for such atrocities.

More ironic is the fact that this happened at an event which celebrates the proclamation of earthly freedom (admittedly though not much changed until 1964). Why? Because this kind of deviant behavior reveals the depravity of the human condition, more precisely, human nature’s bondage to sin and the horrible consequences. It is a bondage which no earthly proclamation can break.

What happened in Austin on Tuesday is a sobering reminder of the consequences of sin in this world, and a costly reminder that only through Jesus Christ are we liberated from sin.

I find then he principle that evil is present in me, the one who wants to do good. For I joyfully concur with the law of God in the inner man, but I see a different law in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin which is in my members. Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death? Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, on the one hand I myself with my mind am serving the law of God, but on the other, with my flesh the law of sin. Romans 7:21-25

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2 Responses to Juneteenth tragedy reveals the heart’s bondage to sin

  1. healtheland says:

    Yeah, I had plans to go to the Juneteeth celebration here in Atlanta and pass out some tracts, try to compete with the black nationalist nonsense at these demonstrations that I used to be sold out into myself with the message of the love of and liberation through Jesus Christ, but I totally forgot. That’s all right though; I’ll be ready next year.

  2. The leader of one of the largest Juneteenth Celebrations in Atlanta in 2007 is a wonderful Christion sister. She is definitely not a black nationalist. 25 state recognize Juneteenth as a state holiday or state holiday observance.

    America needs healing from the legacy of slavery. Juneteenth affords us all as followers of Christ to lead the nation in prayer and example for that healing.

    June 21st was the 8th Annual National Day of Reconciliation and Healing From the Legacy of Slavery. There was also another annual National Juneteenth Black Holocaust “Maafa” Memorial Service in Washington, DC.

    Let’s make a difference for Christ during the celebration of Juneteenth in America.

    “DOC”
    Rev. Ronald V. Myers, Sr., M.D.
    Chairman
    National Juneteenth Christian Leadership Council (NJCLC)
    http://www.njclc.com

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